Two or three column section

A while back I wrote a quick and dirty tutorial on how to display more than one page. This can be done in a number of different ways. You can read about them in other tutorials and guides because this time I’ll go over another method using the WP_Query method. The codex page some really great ways and examples of using it to your advantage, I highly recommend you give it a skim and return to this.

So, on to the code!

What I’ll be using is a switch statement, an active callback, and of course the customizer API.

First we will create the settings and controls:

$wp_customize->add_section( 'demo-front-sections',
				 array(
					 'title' => __( 'Front page sections', 'text-domain' ),
					 'description' => __( 'Choose what pages to show on the front page panels', 'text-domain' ),
					 'priority' => 1,
					 'active_callback' => 'is_front_page'
				 ) );
$wp_customize->add_setting( 'col-count',
				 array(
					'default' => 2,
					'sanitize_callback' => 'absint'
				 ) );
$wp_customize->add_control( 'panel-count',
				 array(
					'settings' => 'col-count',
					'label' => __( 'How many panels on this section', 'text-domain' ),
					'type' => 'radio',
					'choices' => array( '2' => 2, '3' => 3 ),
					'section' => 'demo-front-sections',

				 ) );

// Register the page settings to get the IDs
$wp_customize->add_setting( 'page-1',
				 array(
					'default' => 0,
					'sanitize_callback' => 'absint'
				 ) );
$wp_customize->add_setting( 'page-2',
				 array(
					'default' => 0,
					'sanitize_callback' => 'absint'
				 ) );
$wp_customize->add_setting( 'page-3',
				 array(
					'default' => 0,
					'sanitize_callback' => 'absint'
				 ) );

// Set the controls
$wp_customize->add_control( 'panel-1',
				 array(
					 'settings' => 'page-1',
					 'label' => __( 'Pick what page you would like to showcase', 'text-domain' ),
					 'type' => 'dropdown-pages',
					 'section' => 'demo-front-sections'
				 ) );
$wp_customize->add_control( 'panel-2',
				 array(
					 'settings' => 'page-2',
					 'label' => __( 'Pick what page you would like to showcase', 'text-domain' ),
					 'type' => 'dropdown-pages',
					 'section' => 'demo-front-sections'
				 ) );
$wp_customize->add_control( 'panel-3',
				 array(
					 'settings' => 'page-3',
					 'label' => __( 'Pick what page you would like to showcase', 'text-domain' ),
					 'type' => 'dropdown-pages',
					 'section' => 'demo-front-sections',
					 'active_callback' => 'panel_countcheck'
				 ) );

You’ll notice I used a basic active callback for the section so that the section will only show up on the front page. You may also notice that I’ve added a callback to the third control. We haven’t created that callback so let’s do it:

function panel_countcheck( $value ){
	if ( get_theme_mod( 'col-count' ) > 2 ){
		return true;
	}
	return false;
}

Great! Now what does it do? Let’s break it down a little. So, if the first value ( col-count ) is greater than 2, then let’s show this control, otherwise we won’t. Pretty self-explanatory, right?

Great now we just need to display this on a page template, or the front page ( in our case ). We use get_theme_mod to get the values and the code will look a little like:

// get setting for how many
$count = intval( get_theme_mod( 'col-count', 2 ) );
// create an array for the new query
$ids= array();
// get the pages
$ids[] = intval( get_theme_mod( 'page-1', 0 ) );
$ids[] = intval( get_theme_mod( 'page-2', 0 ) );
if ( $count > 2 ){
	$ids[] = intval( get_theme_mod( 'page-3', 0 ) );
}

$query = new WP_Query( array( 'post_type' => 'page', 'post__in' => $ids, 'orderby' => 'post__in' ) );

switch( $count ){
	case 2:
		while( $query->have_posts() ): $query->the_post();
			echo '<div class="col-2">';
				the_title( '<h2>', '</h2>'); the_content();
			echo '</div>';
		endwhile;
	wp_reset_postdata();
	break;
	case 3:
		while( $query->have_posts() ): $query->the_post();
			echo '<div class="col-3">';
				the_title( '<h2>', '</h2>'); the_content();
			echo '</div>';
		endwhile;
	wp_reset_postdata();
	break;
}

Yeah, it is a little messy but we will break it down and explain what does what.

The first setting we get is the column count. You’ll see that I am using intval because we want to make sure that we are setting an integer. The value being passed from the customizer setting is an ID number that corresponds to a page ID, so we make sure that it really is an integer.

$count = intval( get_theme_mod( 'col-count', 2 ) );

Next up, we get our pages and build up the array that we will pass our new WP_Query. As you can see, we first get the first two pages and conditionally add the third if the $count is greater than 2. Remember this is the setting that the user picks.

$ids[] = intval( get_theme_mod( 'page-1', 0 ) );
$ids[] = intval( get_theme_mod( 'page-2', 0 ) );
if ( $count > 2 ){
	$ids[] = intval( get_theme_mod( 'page-3', 0 ) );
}

From there, we build up the new query. Pretty simple. We make sure that the post type is a page, and the order is maintained by what we pass it.

$query = new WP_Query( array( 'post_type' => 'page', 'post__in' => $ids, 'orderby' => 'post__in' ) );

Now we get to the switch statement! This is where the fun sort of begins.

switch( $count ){
	case 2:
		while( $query->have_posts() ): $query->the_post();
			echo '<div class="col-2">';
				the_title( '<h2>', '</h2>'); the_content();
			echo '</div>';
		endwhile;
	wp_reset_postdata();
	break;
	case 3:
		while( $query->have_posts() ): $query->the_post();
			echo '<div class="col-3">';
				the_title( '<h2>', '</h2>'); the_content();
			echo '</div>';
		endwhile;
	wp_reset_postdata();
	break;
}

Okay. Let’s look over the lines a bit. As you can see we pass it the $count variable we first created, which houses the option of whether to show 2 pages or 3. We create a case for each one and as you can see the only real difference here is the class. For showing two pages it is 2-col and for the 3 it is 3-col. You can create a quick wrapper for that if you want so it can be extended by a child theme like:

function jc_classes(){
	$classes = array();
	$classes[] = 'span';
	$cols = get_theme_mod( 'col-count', 2 );
	switch( $cols ){
		case 2:
		$classes[] = 'col-2';
		break;
		case 3:
		$classes[] = 'col-2';
		break;
	}
	
	return 'class="' . esc_attr( implode( ' ', apply_filters( 'jc_custom_classes', $classes ) ) ) . '"';
}

From there we can lose the switch statement and use:

$query = new WP_Query( array( 'post_type' => 'page', 'post__in' => $ids, 'orderby' => 'post__in' ) );
while( $query->have_posts() ): $query->the_post();
	echo '<div ' . jc_classes() .'>';
		the_title( '<h2>', '</h2>'); the_content();
	echo '</div>';
endwhile;
wp_reset_postdata();

What’s really nice is you can use basic CSS to style it. A quick snippet:

.col-2 {
	float: left;
	width: 50%;
}

.col-3 {
	float: left;
	width: 33%;
}

So, go on, experiment, and fiddle around with the code a bit. Do remember I used basic things, so be sure to add the proper settings, text, and values for your needs.

Published by

Jose

Born in El Salvador. Loves to read, write, draw, paint, build, test, typography, hike, photography, art, design, sewing, and many other things.